Month: September 2015

Ginger for Arthritis

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There’s a reason some call arthritis the nation’s number one crippler.

More than 100 different diseases are collected into the category of arthritis, and the symptom that links all of them is inflammation.

That’s why a new study from Tel Aviv University is so exciting. The study’s authors identified an all-natural arthritis treatment that is just as effective as mainstream medicine’s beloved non-steroidal anti-inflammatories (NSAID’s)—but without the dangerous side effects.

Sharpen your mincing knives, and prepare to embrace the health benefits of ginger.

The latest statistics indicate that approximately 80% of individuals over the age of 50 suffer from osteoarthritis. Nearly 7 million people in the United States alone suffer from rheumatoid arthritis, a chronic condition that inflames the entire body.

Aspirin and other NSAID’s are among the most common treatments for inflammation and pain, yet these drugs, especially NSAID’s, are notorious for their diminishing effectiveness and nasty side effects.

Health Benefits of Ginger

Conventional arthritis treatments cause 3,300 NSAID’s-related ulcer deaths annually.

In contrast, ginger is not only a remarkably safe and natural arthritis treatment, but studies also show it to be equally effective as aspirin and NSAIDs.

On his site Herbal Legacy, Dr. John R. Christopher writes: “Modern science is beginning to demonstrate that the range of diseases that the health benefits of ginger can positively affect as an anti-inflammatory is staggering.” Two clinical trials in Denmark went further and strongly suggested that ginger be included in all arthritis treatment programs.

Health Benefits of Ginger – A Healing Gift

While modern science has only just begun to embrace the health benefits of ginger, it has appeared in the annals of nearly every medical system throughout history. In ancient Ayurvedic texts, ginger is called “vishwabhesaj,” the universal medicine.

Dr. Christopher notes that traditional Chinese and Indian practitioners considered ginger “a healing gift from God.” Now, thanks to advances in technology, scientists can connect inpidual chemical constituents to specific effects.

Somewhat surprisingly, ginger contains a high amount of protein. The root is packed full of vitamins, minerals, and amino acids—notably, vitamin A and niacin. Ginger also contains special components called volatile oils.

Volatile Oils in Ginger Pack A Disease Fighting Punch

These oils are the secret behind its characteristically pungent flavor and many of its health benefits. Two of the most potent of these volatile oils are shagaols and gingerol.

Studies confirm gingerol’s ability to reduce inflammation and block pain pathways. Gingerol and shagaol are proven to neutralize stomach acid… improve circulation… regularize blood pressure… and tone the muscles of the digestive tract. Existing research demonstrates ginger’s efficacy as a treatment for a variety of health issues, such as…

  • Elevated blood sugar and cholesterol levels
  • Cataracts
  • Some blood clotting disorders
  • Radiation exposure
  • Nausea (specifically, resulting from pregnancy or from chemotherapy)
  • Colon cancer
  • Lymphoma
  • Ovarian cancer

Ginger also combats a particular aggravating kind of pain: post-workout muscle soreness. An investigation carried out at the University of Georgia showed both raw and heat-treated ginger alleviates moderate muscular pain.



Eat Beans, Live Long

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Recent research suggests that how many beans you eat is a strong predictor of how long you’ll live.  Unfortunately, 96% of Americans fail to get even the paltry daily recommended intake of half a cup!  Considering there are 13,000 varieties of legumes—from chickpeas to split peas to lentils—this bean dearth is hard to excuse.2e458a024fbc274e_beans_2.preview

Beans Reduce Your Risk of Death

Researchers from different institutions across the globe examined food intake in Japan, Sweden, Greece, and Australia.  Only one food stood out as a contender for lowering risk of death—beans!  And the type of bean didn’t seem to matter at all.  In Japan soy is popular, in Sweden brown beans and peas are preferred, and in the Mediterranean, lentils, chickpeas, and white beans top the charts.  All of these beans were linked to increased longevity.

Load Up on Legumes 

Legumes are low in calories, high in protein, and full of vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants.  They’ve got fiber, folate, vitamin B1, iron, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, and copper, to name a few.  All this goodness translates to bowel regularity, balanced blood sugar levels, low cholesterol, and optimal heart health!  Not to mention, legumes fill you up fast… with fewer calories.  They are the perfect weight loss and weight maintenance food.

Canned vs. Dried 

A recent study published in Food and Nutritional Sciences indicates that canned beans are on par with dried beans when it comes to nutritional value. Plus, they’re much more convenient, as dried beans can take hours to cook up!

It’s worth noting that canned beans are a tad more expensive (20 cents more) and can have up to 100 times the sodium of dried beans. That’s because rinsing and draining dried beans removes some of the excess sodium…but this same process can also remove some vitamins and minerals, too. If you’re a fan of canned legumes, then opt for the “no-salt” varieties to ensure you’re not going overboard on the sodium.

As for flatulence, don’t let a little gas deter you from the nutritional wellspring of legumes! Research shows that although flatulence kicks into gear when you start adding legumes to your diet, your digestive system eventually gets used to it and the flatulence subsides. In other words, stick it out—the gas will evaporate in due time!